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David asks…

So what reasons do first and third world countries have for rallying together during the world cup?

People historically have come together during international competitions for a variety of reasons, but what has evolved over time are the reasons as to why civilizations across the world gather during these competitions. The olympics trace back to 776 BC in Greece and were used to settle conflicts between Greek Acropolis’ in a peaceful manner. As time passed, the Romans under pressure of a growing public unrest and high rates of crimes and civil disobedience were forced to find a solution that would appease the public and calm civil disorder. The answer–sports, and so they built the Roman coliseum and presented the gladiator games. The gladiator games entertained the public, lowered crime, and distracted the public from committing acts of civil disorder. So what does that have to do with today?

Today we all gathered around our TV sets to watch the World Cup game between Spain vs. Germany. If you notice something about first world countries, most gather with friends and/or family to watch the games and use the world cup games as a means to socialize. Whether you are in the U.S., England,Germany, Netherlands, and the list goes on, most people in first world countries gather in bars or at home with friends and family to establish a sort of camaraderie and socialize amongst themselves. This camaraderie and socialization is caused by one’s nationalist sentiment. But the need among third world countries for these events represent something different. Take for example in Mexico, yes we all gather together in our pride and nationalist sentiment for our country, but the day Mexico faced France something magical happened in Mexico. After Mexico stunned France 2-0, reports of violent crime across Mexico fell to it’s lowest level in over 20 years. People all across the nation were so distracted by the victory of Mexico over France that most forgot about the turmoils of reality and chose to unite in celebration. Even in cities such as Tijuana and Juarez, people ran out onto the streets to celebrate and not a single gunshot was heard, not a single gun battle between drug traffickers and military police occurred, and the fewest calls of crime occurred. Moral of the story is that in Mexico the world cup is needed because it gives us one day, just one day, to distract ourselves from the turmoils of reality whether it be poverty, drug trafficking, abductions, and etc. For third world countries and Mexico in particular, the world cup gives people, including crime syndicates, a chance to set down everything and unite together as one people hoping for better days and distracting itself from the present to unite in hope for a better future. Through the victory of the seleccion Mexicana that day against France, all Mexicans united to vicariously live on through El Tri and hope that their victory would be symbolic of a better future ahead for Mexico, not just on the field of a stadium, but on the streets of Mexico as well. My hope is that one day, this comes true.
Insanity: I wrote this, not to fight, but to show hope. That is what the article is about. A nations hope (Mexico‘s hope) for a better day and how we live it through the seleccion. It has nothing to do with where I graduated from. Just read it. I hope you take something from it.

Tijuana answers:

I havent read the post but thinking like the insanity user is what holds us hispanics back from advancing in this country. How about you either move around or actually read it and learn what good sentence structure looks like and how to properly convey your thoughts in writing, instead of bashing it

Sharon asks…

So what reasons do first and third world countries have for rallying together during the world cup?

People historically have come together during international competitions for a variety of reasons, but what has evolved over time are the reasons as to why civilizations across the world gather during these competitions. The olympics trace back to 776 BC in Greece and were used to settle conflicts between Greek Acropolis’ in a peaceful manner. As time passed, the Romans under pressure of a growing public unrest and high rates of crimes and civil disobedience were forced to find a solution that would appease the public and calm civil disorder. The answer–sports, and so they built the Roman coliseum and presented the gladiator games. The gladiator games entertained the public, lowered crime, and distracted the public from committing acts of civil disorder. So what does that have to do with today?

Wednesday we all gathered around our TV sets to watch the World Cup game between Spain vs. Germany. If you notice something about first world countries, most gather with friends and/or family to watch the games and use the world cup games as a means to socialize. Whether you are in the U.S., England,Germany, Netherlands, and the list goes on, most people in first world countries gather in bars or at home with friends and family to establish a sort of camaraderie and socialize amongst themselves. This camaraderie and socialization is caused by one’s nationalist sentiment. But the need among third world countries for these events represent something different. Take for example in Mexico, yes we all gather together in our pride and nationalist sentiment for our country, but the day Mexico faced France something magical happened in Mexico. After Mexico stunned France 2-0, reports of violent crime across Mexico fell to it’s lowest level in over 20 years. People all across the nation were so distracted by the victory of Mexico over France that most forgot about the turmoils of reality and chose to unite in celebration. Even in cities such as Tijuana and Juarez, people ran out onto the streets to celebrate and not a single gunshot was heard, not a single gun battle between drug traffickers and military police occurred, and the fewest calls of crime occurred. Moral of the story is that in Mexico the world cup is needed because it gives us one day, just one day, to distract ourselves from the turmoils of reality whether it be poverty, drug trafficking, abductions, and etc. For third world countries and Mexico in particular, the world cup gives people, including crime syndicates, a chance to set down everything and unite together as one people hoping for better days and distracting itself from the present to unite in hope for a better future. Through the victory of the seleccion Mexicana that day against France, all Mexicans united to vicariously live on through El Tri and hope that their victory would be symbolic of a better future ahead for Mexico, not just on the field of a stadium, but on the streets of Mexico as well. My hope is that one day, this comes true.
I posted this the other day, but I got attacked by someone that missed the point entirely and thought I was calling Mexico a “crap hole” and by another who thought I was trying to gloat about graduating from college…both people missed the point completely and they were the only ones that answered.

Tijuana answers:

Cool story bro…….

William asks…

Should American citizens worry who else is entering the country illegally?

Should we not be worried about terrorist working with drug cartels and entering thru mexico and latin america?
Does this change your mind about who we are letting slip in here?

Friday, March 27, 2009
EXCLUSIVE: Hezbollah uses Mexican drug routes into U.S.
Sara A. Carter (Contact)

EXCLUSIVE:

Hezbollah is using the same southern narcotics routes that Mexican drug kingpins do to smuggle drugs and people into the United States, reaping money to finance its operations and threatening U.S. national security, current and former U.S. law enforcement, defense and counterterrorism officials say.

The Iran-backed Lebanese group has long been involved in narcotics and human trafficking in South America’s tri-border region of Paraguay, Argentina and Brazil. Increasingly, however, it is relying on Mexican narcotics syndicates that control access to transit routes into the U.S.

Hezbollah relies on “the same criminal weapons smugglers, document traffickers and transportation experts as the drug cartels,” said Michael Braun, who just retired as assistant administrator and chief of operations at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

“They work together,” said Mr. Braun. “They rely on the same shadow facilitators. One way or another, they are all connected.

“They’ll leverage those relationships to their benefit, to smuggle contraband and humans into the U.S.; in fact, they already are [smuggling].”

His comments were confirmed by six U.S. officials, including law enforcement, defense and counterterrorism specialists. They spoke on the condition that they not be named because of the sensitivity of the topic.

While Hezbollah appears to view the U.S. primarily as a source of cash – and there have been no confirmed Hezbollah attacks within the U.S. – the group’s growing ties with Mexican drug cartels are particularly worrisome at a time when a war against and among Mexican narco-traffickers has killed 7,000 people in the past year and is destabilizing Mexico along the U.S. border.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton was in Mexico on Thursday to discuss U.S. aid. Other U.S. Cabinet officials and President Obama are slated to visit in the coming weeks.

Hezbollah is based in Lebanon. Since its inception after the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982, it has grown into a major political, military and social welfare organization serving Lebanon’s large Shi’ite Muslim community.

In 2006, it fought a 34-day war against Israel, which remains its primary adversary. To finance its operations, it relies in part on funding from a large Lebanese Shi’ite Muslim diaspora that stretches from the Middle East to Africa and Latin America. Some of the funding comes from criminal enterprises.

Although there have been no confirmed cases of Hezbollah moving terrorists across the Mexico border to carry out attacks in the United States, Hezbollah members and supporters have entered the country this way.

Last year, Salim Boughader Mucharrafille was sentenced to 60 years in prison by Mexican authorities on charges of organized crime and immigrant smuggling. Mucharrafille, a Mexican of Lebanese descent, owned a cafe in the city of Tijuana, across the border from San Diego. He was arrested in 2002 for smuggling 200 people, said to include Hezbollah supporters, into the U.S.

In 2001, Mahmoud Youssef Kourani crossed the border from Mexico in a car and traveled to Dearborn, Mich. Kourani was later charged with and convicted of providing “material support and resources … to Hezbollah,” according to a 2003 indictment.

A U.S. official with knowledge of U.S. law enforcement operations in Latin America said, “we noted the same trends as Mr. Braun” and that Hezbollah has used Mexican transit routes to smuggle contraband and people into the U.S.

Two U.S. law enforcement officers, familiar with counterterrorism operations in the U.S. and Latin America, said that “it was no surprise” that Hezbollah members have entered the U.S. border through drug cartel transit routes.

“The Mexican cartels have no loyalty to anyone,” one of the officials told The Washington Times. “They will willingly or unknowingly aid other nefarious groups into the U.S. through the routes they control. It has already happened. That’s why the border is such a serious national security issue.”

One U.S. counterterrorism official said that while “there’s reason to believe that [Hezbollah members] have looked at the southern border to enter the U.S. … to date their success has been extremely limited.”

However, another U.S. counterterrorism official confirmed that the U.S. is watching closely the links between Hezbollah and drug cartels and said it is “not a good picture.”

A senior U.S. defense official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of ongoing operations in Latin America, warned that al Qaeda also could use trafficking routes to infiltrate operatives into the U.S.

“If I have the mon

Tijuana answers:

MS-13 has ties with Al Qaeda, and drug cartels for the purpose of trafficking people, drugs, and weapons into the U.S. MS-13 is thee largest hispanic street gang in the U.S. Right now, and are expanding at an alarming rate. Their membership is comprised of legal immigrants, and illegal aliens from various hispanic countries.
This is just one reason I quit doing drugs long ago.

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